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AEP will work with states to evaluate impacts of EPA’s ‘Clean Power Plan’ proposal

by on June 3, 2014

(Story by Rachel Hammer)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) June 2 proposed guidelines to be used by states to develop plans to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from existing fossil-fueled power plants. The proposal includes state-by-state goals and provides options that the states can use to develop and implement plans for meeting the reductions.

AEP is evaluating EPA’s proposal and will participate in this process and will work to protect the interests of its customers.

A 120-day public comment period will open once the proposal publishes in the Federal Register. In addition, EPA will hold public hearings in Denver, Atlanta, Washington, D.C. and Pittsburgh during the last week of July. EPA will issue the final rule next year. States’ compliance plans are due in June 2016, with reductions to be phased in over the period between 2020 and 2030.

AEP is evaluating the proposal and will participate in this process and will work to protect the interests of its customers. The company will coordinate with key stakeholders in states where it has power plants to encourage the development of plans that sensibly address each state’s economic and energy needs.

According to EPA, the proposal will reduce CO2 emissions 30 percent overall by 2030. However, initial review of the nearly 700-page proposal indicates that for many states where AEP operates, the requirements could be much higher than 30 percent.

AEP will retire more than one-fourth of its existing coal-fueled power plant fleet in the next few years. The plants that will remain in operation are AEP’s most efficient units. The company has invested more than $10 billion for emission controls in them to comply with other EPA requirements.

From → AEP In The News

One Comment
  1. Glenn Harmoning permalink

    Hello… when someone passes away who does the estate contact on his retirement and if there is a pay out for what is left? thanks glenn

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