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June Retirements

AEP Ohio

Jonathan Butler, 700 Building-Gahanna, retired June 21 after 21 years of service.

Mary Franks, Canton Eastern Regional Office, retired June 16 after 29 years of service.

Wilhelminia Glenn, Canton Eastern Regional Office, retired June 30 after 48 years of service.

Roger Hinkley, Cambridge Service Center, retired June 26 after 32 years of service.

Larry Howell, Southern Ohio Coal Company, retired June 30 after 30 years of service.

Larry Klettlinger, Canton Eastern Regional Office, retired June 9 after 39 years of service.

Mary Levering, Canton Eastern Regional Office, retired June 1 after 23 years of service.

Betty McKimm, Canton Eastern Regional Office, retired June 30 after 42 years of service.

Kathy Pillar, Canton Eastern Regional Office, retired June 30 after 44 years of service.

Richard Pittis, New Philadelphia Service Center, retired June 30 after 40 years of service.

Karen Roberts-Kirksey, Canton Eastern Regional Office, retired June 1 after 40 years of service.

Robert Selock, Zanesville Service Center, retired June 1 after 40 years of service.

Jeffrey Singer, Carrollton Service Center, retired June 9 after 39 years of service.

Rebecca Stasiulewicz, Steubenville Service Center, retired June 23 after 43 years of service.

AEP Service Corporation

James Brown Jr., AEP Headquarters, retired June 12 after 37 years of service.

Monica Calabrese, AEP Headquarters, retired June 8 after 40 years of service.

William Daugherty, AEP Headquarters, retired June 16 after 33 years of service.

Pamela Holloway, Central Operations Center, retired June 1 after 10 years of service.

Timothy King, AEP Headquarters, retired June 30 after 37 years of service.

Michael Pomeroy, AEP Headquarters, retired June 2 after 12 years of service.

Irene Voss, Central Operations Center, retired June 2 after 12 years of service.

Thomas Webb, AEP Headquarters, retired June 21 after 45 years of service.

Charles West, AEP Headquarters, retired June 1 after 21 years of service.

Robert Wilson, Central Operations Center, retired June 30 after 40 years of service.

Terry Youngman, AEP Headquarters, retired June 23 after 34 years of service.

Jeffrey Zerkle, AEP Headquarters, retired June 2 after 41 years of service.

AEP Texas

Craig Geese, Southern Division Office, retired June 26 after 39 years of service.

Frank Guerra Jr., Southern Division Office, retired June 1 after 49 years of service.

Armando Hernandez, Marfa Service Center, retired June 30 after 43 years of service.

Appalachian Power Company

Donna Campbell, Hurricane Call Center, retired June 9 after 27 years of service.

Mark Dempsey, APCO Headquarters, retired June 1 after 42 years of service.

Patricia Enochs, Hurricane Call Center, retired June 2 after 25 years of service.

John Ertz, Bluefield (W.Va.) Service Center, retired June 5 after 28 years of service.

Grover Goolsby III, Lynchburg Service Center, retired June 2 after 41 years of service.

Roger Heslep, Roanoke Main Office, retired June 9 after 36 years of service.

Sherry Hoopes, Roanoke Main Office, retired June 1 after 36 years of service.

Carol Horn, Roanoke Main Office, retired June 30 after 32 years of service.

Kevin Pannell, Roanoke Main Office, retired June 30 after 39 years of service.

Janet Poole, Hurricane Call Center, retired June 2 after 31 years of service.

Clarence Stanley Jr., Lynchburg Service Center, retired June 2 after 33 years of service.

Larry Stanley, Roanoke Main Office, retired June 30 after 37 years of service.

Jimmy Thomas, Glade Spring Service Center, retired June 1 after 29 years of service.

Steve Warden, Milton Service Center, retired June 5 after 33 years of service.

Sarah Wright, Roanoke Main Office, retired June 21 after 24 years of service.

Generation

Dana Aldridge, Amos Plant, retired June 1 after 34 years of service.

Gary Anders, Rockport Plant, retired June 1 after 29 years of service.

George Baboul Jr., Mitchell Plant, retired June 1 after 34 years of service.

Larry Bowers, Rockport Plant, retired June 15 after 40 years of service.

James Bowie, Cook Nuclear Plant, retired June 1 after 11 years of service.

Byron Bradley, Cook Nuclear Plant, retired June 30 after 33 years of service.

James Dabney II, Amos Plant, retired June 1 after 39 years of service.

Georgina Emanuel, Cook Nuclear Plant, retired June 22 after 25 years of service.

Jeffrey Englert, Rockport Plant, retired June 1 after 31 years of service.

William Gibson, Amos Plant, retired June 19 after 40 years of service.

Richard Gulley, Conesville Plant, retired June 30 after 42 years of service.

Sammy Hall, Rockport Plant, retired June 1 after 30 years of service.

Thomas Hammond, Conesville Plant, retired June 1 after 40 years of service.

Robert Heathcote, Cook Nuclear Plant, retired June 2 after 42 years of service.

Harold Hedrick, Amos Plant, retired June 17 after 38 years of service.

William Huggins, Pirkey Plant, retired June 1 after 33 years of service.

Kenneth Jacks, Mountaineer Plant, retired June 1 after 36 years of service.

Richard Kent, Mountaineer Plant, retired June 30 after 41 years of service.

Rhonda Knight, Rockport Plant, retired June 1 after 34 years of service.

Tony McClain, Conesville Plant, retired June 30 after 38 years of service.

David Neigler, Mountaineer Plant, retired June 2 after 38 years of service.

John Parks Jr., Welsh Plant, retired June 1 after 37 years of service.

James Pitts, Mountaineer Plant, retired June 1 after 38 years of service.

Russell Proffit, Conesville Plant, retired June 15 after 35 years of service.

Stephen Rasnake, Clinch River Plant, retired June 6 after 34 years of service.

Terry Raven, Rockport Plant, retired June 1 after 33 years of service.

Wayne Seivertson, Mitchell Plant, retired June 30 after 43 years of service.

Gary Stephens, Rockport Plant, retired June 30 after 33 years of service.

Leonard Stogner, Rockport Plant, retired June 1 after 33 years of service.

Jeffrey Tyo, Mountaineer Plant, retired June 30 after 44 years of service.

Jeff Weaver, Cook Nuclear Plant, retired June 2 after 24 years of service.

Indiana Michigan Power Company

Mary Allen, Buchanan Nuclear Office, retired June 30 after 21 years of service.

Robert Harber, Northeast Service Center, retired June 1 after 34 years of service.

Robert Jones, Marion Service Center, retired June 2 after 37 years of service.

Terry Riggenbach, South Bend Service Center, retired June 2 after 28 years of service.

Kentucky Power Company

Delinda Borden, Ashland Office, retired June 28 after 38 years of service.

Stephen Martin, Robert E. Matthews Service Center, retired June 1 after 40 years of service.

Public Service Company of Oklahoma

Erick Baker, Tulsa General Office, retired June 12 after 22 years of service.

Ricki Fryhover, Mid Metro Office, retired June 6 after 40 years of service.

John Harper, Tulsa General Office, retired June 30 after 39 years of service.

Harriet Lollis, Tulsa General Office, retired June 29 after 10 years of service.

Gary Moore, Tulsa General Office, retired June 16 after 37 years of service.

Joe Roberts, Tulsa General Office, retired June 30 after 11 years of service.

April Westemeir, Tulsa General Office, retired June 23 after 11 years of service.

Southwestern Electric Power Company

Valerie Beal, Shreveport Office, retired June 30 after 11 years of service.

James Cowling Jr., Dolet Hills Lignite Mine, retired June 8 after 33 years of service.

Tim Gregory, Texarkana Operations, retired June 1 after 35 years of service.

John Hubbard, Shreveport General Office, retired June 23 after 48 years of service.

Russell Lowry, Shreveport Operations, retired June 21 after 40 years of service.

Transmission

Kenneth Colvin, AEP Transmission Headquarters, retired June 5 after 22 years of service.

James Fraley, Chillicothe Transmission/Telecom, retired June 29 after 36 years of service.

Gary Hammons, Transmission Operations Center, retired June 26 after 42 years of service.

Mark Majka, AEP Transmission Headquarters, retired June 13 after 35 years of service.

Senior of the Year: Computer-Savvy Sams Thrives in IT Domain

(Story by Andrew King)

Carol Ventresca is aware many people assume seniors and computers don’t mix. And for her, that assumption couldn’t be further from the truth.

As the executive director of Employment for Seniors, 4300 E. Broad St., Columbus, “everything about our program revolves around the computer system,” Ventresca said, and she is frustrated when people are dismissive of seniors involved with technology.

“When employers tell me older adults and seniors can’t do things involving computers, my first response is, ‘I gave out 5,000 job referrals last year, all via computers,’ ” she said.

For Ventresca and a plethora of others, Gary Sams is the perfect example of the effect seniors can have when they harness the power of technology.

The Westerville resident is Senior of the Year and will be honored at the Young at Heart event, sponsored by The Columbus Dispatch and ThisWeek Community News, on Thursday, July 19, at Villa Milano Banquet & Conference Center, 1630 Schrock Road, Columbus. Continue reading…

Transmission Employees Rescue Customer Stranded by Flooding in Corpus Christi

Transmission Line Mechanic Jonathan Gonzalez (second from left) and Transmission Line Mechanics Carlos Zepeda (far left), Gilbert Silvas (second from right) and Roel Garcia (far right) recently rescued a Corpus Christi resident who was left stranded on the roof of her flooded vehicle as the water continued to rise. Photo by Omar Lopez.

(Story by Larry Jones)

“I was terrified and they saved me. Thank you from the bottom of my heart.”

Jennifer McLaughlin’s Facebook post was one of many during the recent extreme rains in the Rio Grande Valley and the Corpus Christi area. Most of the posts focused on service restoration concerns, along with questions regarding outages caused by the rains. McLaughlin’s post (see below) had an even deeper significance. She was trapped on the roof of her car and concerned that her 911 call was not going to be answered soon.

McLaughlin, a Corpus Christi nurse practitioner, was headed home on Tuesday, June 19, when the rain began to result in flooding. That’s when things went from bad to worse.

“It was dark and pouring rain,” she said. “I was behind another car that did not have any problems; so, I thought the water was not that deep. Then, my car died and would not restart, and the water kept getting higher and higher. My car rapidly filled with water; so, I climbed out on to the roof waiting for 911 to send someone. That’s when the AEP truck came to the intersection and maneuvered close enough that they could reach me and take me to higher ground.”

Fortunately, AEP Transmission employees Transmission Line Crew Supervisor Jonathan Gonzalez and Transmission Line Mechanics  Gilbert Silvas, Roel Garcia and Carlos Zepeda already were in the area although preparing to leave. The group had planned an evening clearance outage to complete some transmission project work; however, the rain and subsequent flooding resulted in their canceling those plans.

“We had two large pickup trucks, a bucket truck and a crane to complete the planned work,” Gonzales said. “We were trying to get this equipment out of the area before the flooding got worse. As we were heading out, I noticed that there was a partially submerged Tahoe underneath the overpass, and its vehicle lights were on but flickering.”

The group decided to check the Tahoe to make sure that no passengers were trapped by the flooding. They moved one vehicle closer to get a better view.

“As we got near the overpass, we flashed our lights on the vehicle and noticed that a lady was sitting on top of her Tahoe, and the water was up around the windows,” Gonzalez said.  “We couldn’t even see the hood of the Tahoe.  I am not sure whether she was in a pothole but the back of the vehicle was sitting high and the front seemed low into the water.”

They decided that the safest approach was to drive the larger 4×4 pickup to the Tahoe because that company vehicle had about 1-to-2 feet of clearance above the water level. Once the crew got to the Tahoe, Gonzalez stepped out on the top of the crew truck bins and instructed the customer how he was going to help her off her Tahoe. Once they both were safety back on the top of the truck bins, Garcia put the company truck into reverse and backed the vehicle to the frontage road while Silvas served as a spotter in the cab and Zepeda was stationed on high ground watching and relaying information over his company radio.

Once the group moved to higher ground, they made sure McLaughlin was safe and waited with her until her husband arrived. Police arrived about this time, and the group communicated what happened.

“They were kind, and I was abundantly thankful,” she said about her rescuers. “I’m just glad they were there.”

Cook ‘Elves’ Bring Magic to Christmas in June Food Drive

Generous Cook Plant employees donated 10,876 items to local food pantries June 20.

(Story by Bill Downey)

There’s something to be said for Christmas magic. We look for it every December and somehow, some way, it always shines through.

But this year, thanks to the help of a whole bunch of Cook Nuclear Plant “elves,” that same magic appeared June 20. A magic that will benefit all of Michigan’s Great Southwest. That’s when the United Way of Southwest Michigan delivered approximately 20,000 items to local food pantries, boosted by the 10,876 items provided by the generous donations of Cook employees.

But let’s back up. It’s important first to understand the need and the circumstances.

As in many communities, the local food pantries in Southwest Michigan often see themselves fully stocked in the winter months when charity tends to peak. However, when summer hits and winter supplies run out, those same food pantries find it challenging to keep shelves stocked leaving low-income, hardworking families with very few options.

After receiving requests from several local food pantries that were running low on summer supplies last year, the United Way of Southwest Michigan (UWSM) organized a “Christmas in June” Day of Action to collect as many of those much needed supplies as possible. The help that came was overwhelming. So they repeated the call in 2018. And like last year, Cook led the way in responding  by once again supplying over half of the total of donated items to help refill the food pantries of Berrien and Cass counties in Michigan.

Wish list items included household necessities like laundry soap, toothbrushes and deodorant, as well as non-perishable staples like flour, sugar, and even ramen noodles.

But it wasn’t easy. Cook was just coming out of a long refueling outage when the call for help came this year. And for a while, the cupboards (and the donation boxes) stayed bare.

“We were really getting nervous for a while, there,” said Nuclear Fuels Group Senior Administrative Assistant Jamie Kraft, who was the project leader for the Cook drive. “People were still in ‘outage mode’ and response was slow. But just like a Christmas miracle, the donations came pouring in near the end and we broke all of our records from last year. The Cook folks came through again. They always do. It was amazing!”

In addition to the donations, about 30 individuals from Cook stepped up to assist in the loading, transporting, sorting and delivery of the United Way’s total haul to all the very appreciative food pantries.

“This has been such a tremendous blessing,” said Pastor Jann Mitchell of the Faith Victory Fellowship Church Food Pantry in Buchanan, Michigan. “It will help us feed people through the summer months. Without it, summertime would be very difficult to get through. We are so appreciative of the United Way and all the people who have helped make this possible.”

Pastor Mitchell also received a $220 bonus check for the pantry from Design Engineering Director Jim Petro on behalf of a group of Cook Engineering leaders who, through a special craft beer brewing project (also a United Way fundraiser), collected $1 from every pint of beer they sold as an additional donation to the cause.

“Leave it to the engineers to turn beer into food!” Jim quipped. “But in all seriousness, words aren’t big enough to describe what the Cook team did this year. The goal for us was 100 food items for each of 19 different categories; 1,900 items. We brought in almost 11,000 items. We are helping to ensure that our neighbors won’t go hungry this summer. That’s pretty humbling.”

Indeed it is. Congratulations, Cook Team. And thank you.

River Division’s Leport Recognized by Coast Guard for Outstanding Service

Butch Leport (center) receives the U.S. Coast Guard Meritorious Public Service Award in appreciation for his longstanding actions to promote waterway safety and security on the Ohio River Valley System.

Butch Leport, AEP River Transportation Division port captain, was recently awarded the U.S. Coast Guard Meritorious Public Service Award in appreciation for his longstanding actions to promote waterway safety and security on the Ohio River Valley System.

As chairman of the Huntington District Waterways Association (HDWA) and chairman of the HDWA Navigational Subcommittee, Leport, according to the Coast Guard, “demonstrated profound commitment and championed collaborative efforts between river industry operators and the U.S. Coast Guard.” Leport has dedicated over 2,000 hours to public education and emergency response efforts.

The Coast Guard cited two specific incidents that involved Leport and other River Division employees. First, on March 2, 2017, during a period of high water on the Ohio River, a towing vessel with three loaded tank barges collided into the main lock chamber at the Racine Lock and Dam, breaking the tow apart. Two of the barges and the towboat came to rest against the dam, and the lead barge entered the lock chamber.

One of the first on scene, Leport oversaw implementation of a marine transportation system recovery group that ensured the safe passage of prioritized cargoes through the lock and dam during the response operations.

According to the Coast Guard, “His immense professional expertise over a four-day period provided the Unified Command with critical information and allowed crews to free the vessel from the dam, recover all barges, and prevent the discharge of 3 million gallons of natural gas condensate.”

In a separate event, during that same historic high-water period on the Ohio River, 62 barges near Pittsburgh, Pa., broke free from their moorings and 27 of them collided with the Emsworth Lock and Dam (just downstream from Pittsburgh), resulting in widespread navigational hazards.

Again the Coast Guard called on Leport and again he responded.

“Mr. Leport worked tirelessly with the Coast Guard and developed safe passage and navigation protocols that guaranteed cargo vital to the energy industry reached destinations despite complex ongoing salvage operations,” the Coast Guard said.

Leport is also very active in his community of Gallipolis, Ohio, and supports the Riverworks Discovery effort, which helps educate children and their families about the commerce, culture and conservation of the rivers of America and their watersheds.

“I’m very lucky to have such a great team to work with and be able to draw from the knowledge they offer because it is truly a team effort when dealing with these situations,” Leport said.

‘A True Hero’: Medal of Honor Recipient Honored by AEP

Brian Tierney (left) presents Medal of Honor recipient Herschel “Woody” Williams with a commemorative plaque recognizing his service, on behalf of AEP.

A very special VIP took a ride to Baltimore, Md., recently aboard one of AEP’s aircraft, preceded by a reception attended by AEP employees and family members.

Herschel “Woody” Williams, a U.S. Congressional Medal of Honor recipient and one of only four surviving Medal of Honor recipients from World War II, was provided a flight on the corporate jet with Richard Rogers, chief pilot – Aviation, at the controls.

AEP donated the use of the corporate jet to allow Williams to attend the dedication of a new Gold Star Families Memorial monument honoring fallen military veterans and their families.

Williams is the last surviving Marine Medal of Honor recipient from World War II, and was given the honor of performing the game-opening coin toss at the most recent Super Bowl held in February 2018.

Prior to his flight, he was given a reception by about 35 family members, friends and AEP employees, including Brian Tierney, executive vice president and chief financial officer.

“There’s no way we can properly express our appreciation to you for what you have done, and for what all of those who served beside you also have done for our country,” said Tierney, who presented Williams with a plaque commemorating the event and recognizing his service. “You are a true hero, not only because what you have done in your military service, but how you continue to actively serve military veterans and their families. This is one small way that we extend our thanks, respect and admiration to you.”

Williams, a resident of Fairmont, W.Va., and an Appalachian Power customer, served in the U.S. Marine Corps in World War II. As a demolitions-squad corporal during the Battle of Iwo Jima, on Feb. 23, 1945, he fought for hours to silence the enemy’s reinforced concrete pillboxes that had stopped his company’s advance and caused many casualties.

Williams’ foundation has helped fund the installation of Gold Star Families Memorial monuments at dozens of locations across the country.

Using demolition charges and flamethrowers, he neutralized one enemy gun emplacement after another, frequently struggling under fire to the rear of enemy positions to do so. On one occasion, he mounted a pillbox to insert the nozzle of his flamethrower through an air vent; on another he grimly charged enemy riflemen who attempted to stop him with bayonets. His actions were instrumental in enabling his company to reach its objective.

These actions occurred on the same day that the U.S. flag was raised by soldiers on Iwo Jima’s Mount Suribachi in what became the most iconic image from the war. Read more about Williams’ story in Stars and Stripes.

He is co-founder of a non-profit organization, The Herschel “Woody” Williams Medal of Honor Foundation, that seeks to establish Gold Star Families Memorials throughout the United States. Any organization or group of people can establish a Gold Star Families Memorial monument through the program. The foundation provides guidelines, information, and support to help those taking on the challenge of establishing a monument. So far, 33 monuments have been completed and 50 more are in progress in 36 states. His foundation also offers scholarships to children in Gold Star Families.

“These monuments pay tribute to the families who have lost a loved one in any conflict,” Williams said. “The purpose of each monument is to honor Gold Star Families, preserve the memory of the fallen, and stand as a stark reminder that freedom is not free.”

CancerBridge Can Help

When someone receives a diagnosis of cancer, often there is fear, uncertainty and a need for specific direction that overrules everything else happening at that time. CancerBridge is a cancer information-focused navigation service that provides you with personalized access to cancer experts who may be able to answer general questions you have about cancer and its treatment.

When you call CancerBridge, you will connect with an oncology nurse, who may also bring into the conversation a physician who specializes in the type of cancer diagnosed, if needed. CancerBridge is not a physician referral services and does not provide medical advice or medical consultations, but it provides immediate, informative guidance at a time of uncertainty.

AEP Signs On to Transportation Electrification Accord

The goal of the Transportation Electrification Accord is to educate policymakers on how to advance electric transportation in a manner that provides economic, social and environmental benefits.

AEP has announced that it is participating as a signatory to the Transportation Electrification Accord. The goal of the Accord is to educate policymakers on how to advance electric transportation in a manner that provides economic, social and environmental benefits.

The Accord outlines how transportation electrification can be advanced in a manner that benefits all utility customers and users of all forms of transportation, while supporting the evolution of a cleaner grid. The Accord also reflects broad stakeholder support for principles to guide the development of electric vehicle (EV) charging infrastructure.

Signatories include:

  • In addition to AEP, other leading electric utilities such as Southern Company, Exelon, SCE, PG&E, SDG&E and National Grid.
  • Major auto industry manufacturers and suppliers (GM, Honda, BYD, etc.)
  • Industry organizations (EEI, Alliance for Transportation Electrification, Plug In America, Advanced Energy Economy, etc.)
  • Non-governmental organizations (CERES, NRDC, Sierra Club, etc.)

 

Phil Dion, vice president of Technology Business Development said that “accelerating customer adoption of EVs is an important objective, as we can lower customer bills through the optimized use of the grid, while simultaneously increasing our revenues. The principles of this accord support our role as the critical enabler and integrator of EVs and charging infrastructure.”

Sandy Nessing, managing director of Corporate Sustainability added, “EVs are a fantastic example of how AEP can support new electric technology adoption that improves the environment, consistent with our sustainability objectives.”

Among the guiding principles of the Accord are the following statements:

  • There is a clear case for electrifying transportation, which can provide benefits to all consumers (including the socioeconomically disadvantaged), advance economic development, create jobs, provide grid services, integrate more renewable energy, and cut air pollution and greenhouse gases.
  • Accelerating an appropriate deployment of electric vehicle charging infrastructure based on market penetration projections along highway corridors, as well as throughout local cities and towns, is a critical element of electrifying transportation.
  • It is critical to support electric transportation at the state and local government levels, whether it be through governors, state legislators, state commissions, state transportation agencies, state energy offices, mayors, or local governments.
  • Under appropriate rules, it is in the public interest to allow investor-owned and publicly-owned utilities to participate in and facilitate the deployment of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) and/or supporting infrastructure for residential and commercial applications in their service territories to accomplish state and local policy goals. The distribution grid is incorporating new grid-edge features such as advanced demand response and distributed energy storage. In that broader context, utilities are well-positioned to ensure that installed EVSE, whether owned by utilities or other parties, maximizes the public benefits of these innovations, through appropriate integration of these technologies in order to maximize electrical system benefits for all classes of customers.
  • Utilities should proactively engage their regulators, consumers and all stakeholders in developing rate designs, infrastructure deployment programs, and education and outreach efforts that benefit all utility customers and allow reasonable cost recovery, while accelerating widespread transportation electrification that supports a reliable and robust grid.

Obituaries

AEP Energy Services

Virgul Goudia, 71, Elmwood Cleaning and Repair Facility, died May 19.

John Lavergne, 65, Elmwood Convent Fleet & Repair, died April 16.

AEP River Transportation Division

Gerald Boggs, 70, River Transportation Division, died May 2.

John Morman, 97, retired, River Transportation Division, died May 1.

AEP Service Corporation

John Bauer, 91, retired, Rockefeller Center, died April 25.

Richard Dorman III, 54, AEP Headquarters, died May 25.

Hann Jeang, 88, retired, AEP Headquarters, died May 11.

Stanley Kennedy, 75, CSW Tulsa, died April 5.

AEP Texas

W. H. Aiken, 81, retired, Merkel Office, died April 29.

Valerie Brock, 81, retired, Abilene General Office, died May 22.

Percy Jeane, 86, retired, Corpus Christi Office, died May 7.

Ty Koch, 76, retired, Corpus Christi Office, died April 2.

Walter Moseley, 90, retired, Corpus Christi Office, died May 6.

Lee Secrest, 97, retired, Corpus Christi Office, died April 10.

Appalachian Power Company

Susan Bauer, 59, retired, Huntington Service Center, died May 4.

Donald Buckland, 88, retired, Glen Lyn Plant, died April 30.

Robert Crowder, 93, retired, Princeton Service Center, died April 23.

Darrel Sanford, 87, retired, Beckley Service Center, died May 24.

Metzel Turley, 83, retired, Central Machine Shop, died May 12.

Columbus Southern Power Company

David Daubenmire, 70, Picway Plant, died April 28.

Parks Deaton, 86, retired, 850 Tech Center, died April 27.

John McClain Jr., 86, retired, Conesville Plant, died May 12.

Jack McPeek, 71, retired, Athens Service Center, died May 17.

Ronald Nindle, 74, retired, Athens Service Center, died May 25.

Elean Tussey, 92, retired, 850 Tech Center, died May 28.

Indiana Michigan Power Company

Mary Clingman, 89, retired, One Summit Square, died April 5.

Elizabeth Lull, 94, retired, St. Joseph Service Center, died May 8.

Evsey Neymotin, 75, retired, Buchanan Nuclear Office, died April 25.

Phillip Johnson, 81, retired, Avilla Service Center, died May 1.

David Russell, 75, Cook Nuclear Plant, died April 26.

Ohio Power Company

Alexandra Aquino, 28, Mitchell Plant, died May 4.

James Holland Jr., 63, Cardinal Plant, died May 21.

William Roe, 79, retired, Central Ohio Coal Company, died April 15.

John Schell Jr., 68, Cardinal Plant, died May 10.

William Smitley, 88, retired, Central Ohio Coal Company, died April 25.

Donald Stafford, 82, retired, Lancaster Service Building, died May 25.

Perry Tackett, 87, retired, Southern Ohio Coal Company, died April 8.

Eugene Watts, 90, retired, Lima Service Center, died April 9.

Bernard Weigand, 81, retired, Mitchell Plant, died May 24.

Public Service Company of Oklahoma

Jack Baird, 82, retired, Tulsa General Office, died April 29.

Elizabeth Chalkley, 94, retired, Tulsa General Office, died April 15.

Lewis Fryer, 85, retired, Tulsa General Office, died April 15.

J.M. Jones, 55, Northeastern Station 1&2, died May 15.

Kenneth Kliesen, 78, retired, Mid Metro Office, died April 18.

Harold McBrayer, 88, retired, Tulsa General Office, died April 24.

Andrew Phillips, 86, retired, Tulsa General Office, died May 27.

Wayne Schweikhard, 94, retired, Tulsa General Office, died April 20.

Leo Smith, 85, retired, Tulsa General Office, died April 25.

Loyse Whisman, 88, retired, Tulsa General Office, died May 3.

Southwestern Electric Power Company

Lucille Magart, 96, retired, Shreveport General Office, died May 30.

Donna Mull, 78, retired, Shreveport General Office, died April 26.

Marlin Sipes, 69, Longview Operations, died May 6.

William Staggs, 75, retired, Shreveport General Office, died April 28.

Transmission

Dennis Anderson, 62, 700 Building-Gahanna, died May 4.

Michal Gentry, 64, Tulsa General Office, died May 18.

J.S. Gutierrez Jr., 71, La Palma Transmission Station, died May 3.

John Peterson, 72, Tulsa General Office, died April 16.

Dan Waller, 63, Tulsa General Office, died May 1.

May Retirements

AEP Energy Services

Kenneth Ecoffey, Home Worksite-Ohio, retired May 12 after 15 years of service.

AEP Ohio

Ted Armstrong, Newark Service Building, retired May 1 after 32 years of service.

Barbara Beyser, Wheeling Service Building, retired May 30 after 40 years of service.

Richard Davis, Minerva Annex, retired May 1 after 44 years of service.

William Deweese Jr., Minerva Annex, retired May 31 after 40 years of service.

Kay Lorson, Canton Eastern Regional Office, retired May 1 after 27 years of service.

Jeffrey Poulton, Grandview Service Center, retired May 5 after 42 years of service.

Mark Still, Pomeroy Service Building, retired May 1 after 44 years of service.

Joseph Taylor, Wheeling Service Building, retired May 16 after 38 years of service.

AEP Service Corporation

Dennis Studer, AEP Headquarters, retired May 1 after 44 years of service.

Donald Untch, AEP Headquarters, retired May 5 after 39 years of service.

AEP Texas

Russell Dettling, El Campo Service Center, retired May 22 after 36 years of service.

Ronald Ford, Corpus Christi Office, retired May 3 after 31 years of service.

William Johnson, Lipan Service Center, retired May 26 after 26 years of service.

Henry Ladewig, El Campo Service Center, retired May 19 after 30 years of service.

Calvin Littlecreek, Quanah Office, retired May 1 after 38 years of service.

Appalachian Power Company

Gregory Arrington, Lynchburg Service Center, retired May 1 after 34 years of service.

Thomas Bondurant, Lynchburg Service Center, retired May 23 after 41 years of service.

Randolph Forrester, Glade Spring Service Center, retired May 1 after 40 years of service.

Gary McGraw, Beckley Service Center, retired May 1 after 14 years of service.

Loren Michels, Huntington Service Center, retired May 12 after 37 years of service.

David Mowbray, Roanoke Service Building, retired May 19 after 32 years of service.

William Noble, Bluefield (W.Va.) Service Center, retired May 8 after 40 years of service.

Linda Smith, Roanoke Main Office, retired May 1 after 45 years of service.

Reginald Smith, Beckley Service Center, retired May 1 after 44 years of service.

Gerald Swanson, Roanoke Service Building, retired May 1 after 33 years of service.

Generation

Charles Archey, Cook Nuclear Plant, retired May 24 after 41 years of service.

Arvella Barber, Mitchell Plant, retired May 30 after 21 years of service.

Thomas Barnhart, Mitchell Plant, retired May 1 after 38 years of service.

Mark Bowhuis, Cook Nuclear Plant, retired May 26 after 36 years of service.

Ralph Bowling, Mountaineer Plant, retired May 10 after 37 years of service.

Ronnie Callender, Amos Plant, retired May 30 after 38 years of service.

Jeffery Clark, Cook Nuclear Plant, retired May 5 after 26 years of service.

Billie Drace, Rockport Plant, retired May 1 after 34 years of service.

Robert Entrekin, Conesville Plant, retired May 1 after 40 years of service.

Lanette Gravitt, Pirkey Plant, retired May 31 after 30 years of service.

Donald Holmes, Mitchell Plant, retired May 1 after 30 years of service.

John Holmes, Mitchell Plant, retired May 1 after 38 years of service.

Roy Howell, Oklaunion Power Plant, retired May 25 after 31 years of service.

Aaron Litman, Mitchell Plant, retired May 1 after 33 years of service.

Carl Matheny, Mountaineer Plant, retired May 31 after 38 years of service.

Gregg Newman, Mitchell Plant, retired May 5 after 40 years of service.

Richard Rollison, Conesville Plant, retired May 1 after 41 years of service.

Edward Roush, Mountaineer Plant, retired May 31 after 31 years of service.

Edward Ruckman, Mitchell Plant, retired May 1 after 29 years of service.

Donald Shamblin, Amos Plant, retired May 1 after 33 years of service.

David Thomson, Conesville Plant, retired May 26 after 29 years of service.

Jay Zarnoth, Rockport Plant, retired May 5 after 29 years of service.

Indiana Michigan Power Company

James Armstrong, One Summit Square, retired May 1 after 37 years of service.

James Brandner, South Bend Service Center, retired May 1 after 42 years of service.

Public Service Company of Oklahoma

Richard Reynolds, Energy Control Center, retired May 23 after 36 years of service.

Southwestern Electric Power Company

Janett Britt, Shreveport Office, retired May 4 after 11 years of service.

Jimmy Farmer, Longview Operations, retired May 3 after 17 years of service.

Kenneth Hawkins, Mt. Pleasant Office, retired May 19 after 36 years of service.

Venita McCellon-Allen, Shreveport General Office, retired May 2 after 34 years of service.

Transmission

Tommy Abbott, Transmission Operations Center, retired May 5 after 40 years of service.

Bruce Hess, Muncie Service Center, retired May 11 after 38 years of service.

James Lowe, John W. Vaughan Center, retired May 5 after 10 years of service.

Ronney Ortigo, Longview Operations, retired May 25 after 36 years of service.

Peter Selent, AEP Transmission New Albany HQ, retired May 12 after 29 years of service.