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Appalachian Power Hosts W.Va Teachers for STEMersion Experience

A group of teachers from West Virginia pose at the John E. Amos Power Plant visitor center, prior to a tour of the plant. The teachers were part of STEMersion, a one-week professional development experience.

(Story by Matthew Thompson)

WINFIELD, W.Va — Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) are key skills needed in today’s workplace.

That message was the motivation for 25 middle and high school science, technology and math teachers who received a professional development experience called STEMersion.

An initiative of BridgeValley Community & Technical College (BVCTC), The Education Alliance and the West Virginia Manufacturing Association, the one-week professional development experience for teachers includes immersion at top STEM businesses in the Kanawha Valley.

Appalachian Power participated in the event as teachers visited the John E. Amos Power Plant in Winfield. During the site visit, participants experienced firsthand the types of knowledge and skills required for the ever-increasing STEM-related careers in the state. The tour included visits to the plant floor and talks with company leaders in generation, transmission and distribution.

Teachers that took part in the activities said they found the day very insightful.

“It made me understand what they have to go through to get our power to our homes,” said Teresa Swanson, a teacher at Elkview Middle School. “It also made me realize what they have to do to get back on when it goes out.”

Swanson said many students may not be college bound. But she said the STEMersion experience gives her tools to help certain students to ensure they get proper job training.

“They may not want to go to college, but they are good with their hands,” Swanson said. “I can now go back to them and say it’s OK to not go to college, but you still need training get in a job with advancement and have a long career.”

Michelle Smith, a counselor at Dunbar Middle School, said she was fascinated by how Appalachian Power has advanced over the years – particularly with electric meters.

“They were showing us different meters and how they have progressed from these big bulky things to smaller ones that are so cool,” Smith said.

Smith said the day also gave her a newfound gratitude of line workers.

“Putting on all that equipment, I mean, that stuff is heavy,” Smith said. “I have much appreciation for all the things they have to go through.”

Dr. Amelia Courts, president and chief executive officer of The Education Alliance, said the STEMersion program is paramount for area teachers.

“The Education Alliance was pleased to offer the STEMersion teacher professional development opportunity in collaboration with our partners,” Courts said.

“Research shows the more hands-on the opportunities are, the more teachers learn. The STEMersion project did just that by connecting STEM-centered businesses with educators who are eager to make real-word applications. Ninety-eight percent of participating teachers rated the training as ‘very good or excellent’ and we look forward to seeing the innovative ways teachers implement STEMersion in their classrooms with students.”

AEP Benefits Summary Plan Descriptions On The Way

The printing of the updated AEP Benefits Summary Plan Descriptions (SPDs) is complete and shipping is scheduled to begin on August 11 and 12. The updated documents are being mailed to the home addresses of retired employees. Should you have any questions, please contact the AEP Benefits Center at 1-888-237-2363.

 

 

Djabatey Delivers Inspirational Speech at Columbus Ohio AABE Scholarship Reception

(Story by Fay White)

Eight recent high school graduates listened intently as Jesse Djabatey delivered his speech at the 2016 Columbus Ohio Chapter of the American Association of Blacks In Energy (AABE) scholarship reception.

The graduates were being honored as scholarship recipients.

Jesse Djabatey, AEP market risk analyst, inspired graduates with a speech he delivered at the Columbus Ohio American Association of Blacks In Energy scholarship reception. Photos by Caitlin Sadler.

Djabatey’s message was especially meaningful because he once sat where they were sitting. Five years ago, Djabatey also received an AABE scholarship.

During his speech, he talked about the scholarship reception he attended with his parents.

“This was the beginning of when everything in my life changed for the better,” Djabatey said. “I may not have received the greatest monetary award that night, but I went home with the most valuable award — a business card.”

Djabatey shared his story of how, as a high school senior who was tired of writing essays and attending numerous scholarship events, he arrived about five minutes late to the reception. His intention to sit quietly in the back with his parents did not go as planned.

A lady approached Djabatey and asked him to join her table. That lady happened to be Tracie Campbell, board member and past president of the Columbus Ohio Chapter of AABE.

Campbell also works for AEP Ohio as an energy efficiency marketing and advertising coordinator.

At Campbell’s table were about three to four people; among them was Brian Tierney, executive vice president and chief financial officer for AEP.

During dinner, Djabatey and Tierney struck up a conversation. Djabatey told Tierney about how he managed to simultaneously take classes in high school and college. Tierney seemed intrigued, and before he left the event he handed Djabatey his business card and told him to call him so they could talk some more.

“I don’t think it dawned on me what had just happened,” Djabatey said. “I remember Tracie kept reminding me throughout the reception that I should really follow up and call him. She said, ‘This opportunity doesn’t come around too often.’”

It was a good two weeks before he contacted him. With urging from his mother, he finally picked up his laptop and sent Tierney an email.

“As a result, Brian and I developed a relationship,” he said. “Fast forward to five years later, here I am working at AEP fulltime as a market risk analyst, after interning in the Market Risk Oversight group all four of my college years.”

Raised in Accra, Ghana, Djabatey moved to California and then to Columbus where he attended Mifflin High School. He was accepted into DeVry University’s Advantage Academy where he was able to complete college courses while in high school.

In 2011, he graduated as valedictorian of Mifflin with an associate degree of applied science in web graphic design from DeVry. In 2015, Djabatey graduated from Miami University with a Bachelor of Arts in economics.

Tracie Campbell, energy efficiency coordinator – AEP Ohio, shares a conversation with Jesse Djabatey, one of many individuals she has mentored through her work with AABE, Big Brothers Big Sisters and Junior Achievement.

AEP and AEP Ohio have been longtime supporters and corporate sponsors of the Columbus Ohio Chapter of AABE, which celebrated its 10th year awarding scholarships to help prepare young people for success. Each year, the chapter awards grants to African American, Hispanic and Native American students pursuing college in energy-related fields.

“I am so proud to work for a company that supports our youth by devoting its resources to our scholarship program, and for leaders like Brian Tierney, who gave his time to mentor Jesse,” Campbell said. “With AEP’s and AEP Ohio’s help, the Columbus Ohio Chapter of AABE has been able to award nearly $330,000 in scholarships to high school seniors in central Ohio.”

Tierney also attended the reception with [Nick Akins], AEP chairman, president and chief executive officer, and [Charles Patton], Appalachian Power president and chief operating officer, who presented the keynote address.

Djabatey ended his speech by offering the graduates some words of encouragement:

“Be prepared! You never know when an opportunity will knock at your door. If I hadn’t been prepared, I would have never made it as a recipient to this scholarship five years ago. I would have lost my golden opportunity and most certainly wouldn’t be here talking to you today.

“Whenever you find your Brian Tierney or Tracie Campbell, make sure to always show your appreciation and gratitude. I am forever thankful for the opportunity to show my talents at AEP and to my parents who always taught me to never to give up.”

Congratulations to this year’s recipients:

Lavonca Davis, Pickerington High School North. Field of Interest – Chemical Engineering

Dajah Howard, Columbus Africentric Early College. Field of Interest – Chemical Engineering

John Martin, Centerville High School. Field of Interest – Chemical Engineering

Walid Musa, Northland High School. Field of Interest – Electrical Engineering

Martha Nyarko, Mifflin High School. Field of Interest – Allied Health/Human Biology

Osaretinmwen Onaiwu, Eastmoor Academy. Field of Interest – Mechanical Engineering

Joshua Smith, Olentangy Orange High School. Field of Interest – Biological Sciences

LaMiah Tysinger, Reynoldsburg High School Encore Academy. Field of Interest – Chemical Engineering

Seven New Television Commercials Air to Bolster AEP’s Image

Employees from across the AEP system, including Elgin Janssen (above), community affairs manager for AEP Texas, will appear in seven new 30-second television commercials starting this week.

(Story by Teresa McWain)

Employees from across the AEP system will appear in seven new 30-second television commercials starting this week. The commercials will be the final installment introduced this year to create greater awareness of AEP’s commitment to customers and communities.

A total of 28 spots, four for each operating company, have been airing intermittently since winter to bring a greater focus to the work AEP employees do on the job and beyond to improve lives where they live and work.

The campaign, which also includes newsprint and digital components launched during spring and earlier this summer, will run through year end. The digital component drives viewers to a landing page for each operating company to explore additional footage, photos and the stories of employees who participated in the campaign.

See the new television commercials:

AEP Ohio  Underground: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fng2C9sBSrU

AEP Texas Habitat: https://youtu.be/NW6-ZEuEOVI

Appalachian Power Kanawha: https://youtu.be/Fflme7yViIM

Indiana Michigan Power Classroom: https://youtu.be/NQS9uvuBxTw

Kentucky Power Hospital: https://youtu.be/oRPrj4nFgtc

PSO Treeline:  https://youtu.be/vZ9IEaH2E1M

SWEPCO Park: https://youtu.be/88-KbfNn1wA

See additional campaign footage on operating company landing pages:

http://aepohio.com/OurPeople
http://aeptexas.com/OurPeople
http://appalachianpower.com/OurPeople
http://indianamichiganpower.com/OurPeople
http://kentuckypower.com/OurPeople
http://psoklahoma.com/OurPeople
http://swepco.com/OurPeople

Rockport Retiree to be Honored as Pioneering African American Athlete

Rockport Plant retiree Houston Hogg will be honored with a statue by the University of Kentucky as one of the first four African American football players at the university. Photo by: Matt Lundsford, Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer.

Editor’s Note: Houston Hogg, a retired employee of Indiana Michigan Power’s Rockport Plant in Rockport, Ind., will be honored as one of the first four African American football players at the University of Kentucky by the university in September. Hogg retired in 2013 as a coal equipment operator senior after working at the plant for 27 years. He and his wife of 44 years, Deborah, have six children and 19 grandchildren, and have been foster parents to more than 200 children over the past 25 years. The story of the former UK running back has also been featured in Owensboro Living and other publications. This story, written by Mark Mathis, was published in the Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer on July 20, 2016, and has been edited.

OWENSBORO, Ky. — Houston Hogg really measured every word he said when describing what it was like to be one of the first African American football players at the University of Kentucky (UK).

“The racial stuff, it was kind of random. I was too big that they couldn’t walk up and call me names,” Hogg said. “The teammates seemed to be (accepting), but you’ve heard ‘they smile in your face.’ There was some like, ‘I don’t want to room with him.’ I guess the worst time for me, my roommate got married and he moved out. I was in the dorm by myself. That was kind of rough. It was kind of isolated.”

Hogg, who was 6-foot-1, 235 pounds in his prime, was looking way back into time as he told those stories at his house in the Seven Hills area. After Hogg went to UK for four years in the late 1960s, he has lived, worked and raised a family in Owensboro.

Hogg came here from his hometown of Hazard before his senior year in high school, and he played one year of football at Daviess County High School. His parents found jobs in Owensboro, which caused the family to move here.

It was obviously tough for the 68-year-old to take that journey back through the decades. Leaving some stadiums, Hogg felt like he’d made it through some kind of survival drill, and in a lot of ways he had.

“(During one game), I got my bell rung, a coach was trying to put me back in, but I wouldn’t go,” Hogg said. “I don’t remember telling him I wouldn’t go in.”

A major moment Hogg does remember is a road trip to LSU.

“I’d say the worst experience was Baton Rouge,” Hogg said. “We played LSU, they beat us, the coaches gave us (food money) to go eat on. The place we went, they told us they had a place around back where they’d serve us, get it out the back window.

“A waitress told us as nice as she could, we can’t serve you two up here, you’ve got to go around back.”

There was nearly an altercation at the restaurant, and Hogg along with Wilbur Hackett made a dash back to the team hotel.

“When we got there, state police were everywhere,” Hogg said. “What got me was… that was a long time ago. All those dogs and stuff they had when we got back to the hotel. We got a letter a couple of weeks later from the governor of Louisiana, apologizing for the way they treated us.”

Hogg, Hackett, Nate Northington and the late Greg Page (not the Louisville-born boxer) were the four UK players who integrated SEC football in the late 60s.

UK will be honoring those four players with a statue that will be located in front of the new UK football practice facility that is nearly complete.

It will be unveiled at a special event on Thursday, Sept. 22. The Wildcats will host South Carolina in their first SEC home game two days later and celebrate Northington becoming the first African American to play in an SEC game on Sept. 30, 1967.

A poster honoring Northington, Page, Hackett and Hogg has been available to the public since July 16 — it features four players from this year’s team in poses modeled after the statue currently being sculpted. The poster is meant to pay tribute to the four trailblazers who paved the way for what Kentucky football is today.

The 2016 season marks 50 years since Northington and Page enrolled at UK in 1966. Page died after suffering an injury in a practice during his and Northington’s sophomore years. Northington left UK and went to Western Kentucky University.

Hogg finished his career at UK, left Lexington with a lot of tough emotions, and came back to Owensboro because his mother, Margaret Hogg, was still living here and couldn’t drive. “I came back because of her,” Houston said.

He and his wife Deborah have six children and 19 grandchildren. The influence of Hogg’s family has been deep in various athletic venues through the years, mostly at Owensboro High School, but also at Owensboro Catholic.

Hogg didn’t talk to his kids about his UK football career until they were older.

“A lot of people ask me ‘why didn’t you tell them your story when they were growing up?’ but I had a reason not to tell them,” Houston said. “I wanted them to get along with people, not to be mad at anybody for what I went through.

“I kept it from them for a long time. When they got older, we were talking, I would make a joke out of something that actually happened, and they questioned me, is that true? Yeah, that’s true.

“You’ve got to live with it, and forgive in your heart. You just can’t say I forgive you, you’ve got to really do it. If you don’t it’s going to eat you alive.”

Hogg is grateful that UK will make permanent the contributions of him and his former teammates.

“I’m honored they would do something like that,” Hogg said. “We’re talking about one of the greatest institutions around here, and they’re going to honor me with a statue. I’m proud that they are.”

Akins Discusses AEP’s Second Quarter Financial Results with Cramer on ‘Mad Money’

AEP CEO Nick Akins (right) appeared on “Mad Money with Jim Cramer” July 28

Nick Akins, AEP chairman, president and chief executive officer, spoke with Jim Cramer of “Mad Money with Jim Cramer” on CNBC July 28 following AEP’s 2016 second-quarter earnings report.

View the entire segment.

In discussing AEP’s strong second-quarter results — which beat Wall Street expectations — Cramer asked Akins if the company was surprised by its success.

“It wasn’t any surprise to us because we’ve been investing in infrastructure — particularly in transmission,” Akins answered. “The earnings profile of transmission continues to improve dramatically and also weather — we had more normal weather (in the second quarter). In previous quarters, the weather was very light. Obviously, we had a good outcome as a result.”

Cramer also noted from AEP’s earnings report that sales to both residential and commercial customers improved during the second quarter, but industrial sales declined.

“Residential and commercial customer sales both increased during the quarter and usage by customers continues to improve,” Akins said. “One issue we have is around industrial load. If you look at industrial and manufacturing, we’re seeing a slowdown from an oil and gas perspective, and mining, as well. Mining is being hit pretty hard. Within our territory, we’re seeing 22,000 less jobs in oil and gas and mining from year-to-year. That’s a substantial amount of job loss, and a lot of that was in our western territory in Arkansas, Oklahoma, Louisiana and Texas. You’re starting to see a significant slowdown in that activity. You’re seeing an 18 percent reduction on the mining side of things, so we have to watch that very closely.”

As a hedge, Akins told Cramer AEP is investing in renewables and converting some coal plants to natural gas. Cramer asked if AEP would consider purchasing a natural gas pipeline company to further expand its portfolio.

“One thing we look at is the threshold around investments,” Akins responded. “Again, we have the largest transmission system in the country, so when you look at the ability to deploy capital, you want to be able to do that wisely. Our investments really focus on transmission and other types of investments such as renewables. We continue to move into that space because we’re really focused on what the customer experience is going to be in the future. Maybe at some future time (AEP will consider pipeline investment), but we have a runway ahead of us in transmission investment that is really good for us.”

AEP Leads National Discussion on Technology Innovation

Leaders from energy companies and technology partners gathered at AEP’s headquarters in Columbus, Ohio, recently to discuss power grid innovations. Photo by Sarah Hunyadi.

(Story by Shanelle Hinkle-Moore)

“AEP is collaborating to modernize a complex system in a way that’s reliable, simple for customers to use and affordable.”

These are the words Phil Dion, vice president, Technology Business Development, used to describe AEP’s leadership in the Institute for Electric Innovation (IEI) National Dialogue Series.

AEP recently hosted one of IEI’s national discussions in Columbus, Ohio.

Dion co-moderated the open-dialogue exchange, which consisted of leaders and experts from energy companies and technology partners, with Lisa Wood, IEI’s executive director and executive vice president.

Bob Powers, AEP executive vice president and chief operating officer, kicked off the event with a welcome and opening remarks. Other AEP leaders who engaged in the discussion included Tom Kirkpatrick, vice president, Customer Services, Marketing and Distribution Services; and Tom Weaver, Distribution Systems Planning manager.

The roundtable’s purpose was to share best practices, innovations, and overcoming challenges to building a smarter and integrated power grid. A special focus was given to adapting technology which makes the system more segmented, which will make it more complex to manage.

There was a significant discussion about the costs of integration. Powers provided an example using his analog watch. Despite the timepiece’s inability to measure to the picosecond, it’s an effective tool and more affordable than other options. He advised, while new technologies may be attractive, the group must strive to apply technologies that are cost effective to customers.

Meeting attendees shared their perspectives on a variety of topics, including:

  • Digital Grid Platform — Where are we today.
  • Operating on the Grid Edge — Distributed energy resource integration and management.
  • Digital Grid of the Future — What a fully integrated digital power grid may look like in 2022, the value opportunities, and barriers to moving forward.

 

The meeting was IEI’s first of three national dialogues on energy technology related topics. Future topics will include data analytics and access, and a clean energy future through partnerships.

Following the event, IEI representatives met with AEP’s Technology Council for further insight and conversation.

Why it’s important
AEP is committed to success as a next generation energy company. Hosting this forum is an example of how AEP actively engages to improve business and collaborate across the energy industry and with technology partners. Building a smarter energy infrastructure will help provide enhanced service and reliability. These efficiencies and innovative programs will help our customers save resources and money.

More about IEI
IEI’s purpose is to advance the adoption and application of new technologies to strengthen and transform the power grid. IEI’s members are investor-owned electric companies that represent nearly 70 percent of the U.S. electric power industry.

AEP Retiree Writes Book About Substance Abuse

OHIO VALLEY — Kevin Dennis’s new book, “God Can: Redemption and Hope in the Drug Abuse War,” shows the powerful hand of God in the resurrection of a dilapidated school property into a facility to rebuild lives.

When Dennis and his wife faced the drug addiction of their adult daughter, they desperately searched for something or someone to help. In this book, they share their firsthand experiences to help others find help, hope and healing.

Dennis graduated from Ohio State University with a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry. He retired from American Electric Power as an environmental manager with oversight of 70 electric generating plants in 11 states. He acquired important skills to aid in the Field of Hope revitalization.

Continue reading…

Obituaries

AEP River Operations

William Cain, 64, AEP River Operations-Convent, died June 21.

Milton Lincoln, 58, AEP River Operations-Paducah, died May 21.

John Nibert, 94, retired, River Transportation Division, died June 17.

Randall Wedge, 58, River Transportation Division, died June 23.

AEP Service Corporation

Tim Howdyshell, 60, AEP Headquarters, died June 11.

Ralph Pastore, 87, retired, AEP Headquarters, died May 26.

Appalachian Power Company

Richard Dick, 82, retired, Hartford City Service Center, died June 19.

Dennis Fletcher, 84, retired, Bb&T Building, died June 9.

Stephen Greenlee, 63, Mountaineer Plant, died June 9.

George Grimm, 88, retired, Mountaineer Plant, died June 27.

Charles Jones, 83, retired, North Charleston Service Center, died June 17.

James Oliver, 98, retired, Roanoke Main Office, died May 20.

William Rowley, 88, retired, Roanoke Main Office, died June 16.

Charles Shannon, 77, retired, Roanoke Service Building, died June 14.

Cecil Watson, 75, retired, Gate City Service Center, died June 11.

Columbus Southern Power Company

Richard Buchanan, 76, retired, Athens Service Center, died June 24.

Willard Frost, 87, retired, Hillsboro Service Center, died June 7.

Wilma Johnson, 86, retired, Chillicothe Office, died June 5.

Robert Peters, 85, retired, Picway Plant, died June 25.

Alvin Pierce, 83, retired, Chillicothe Office, died March 12.

William Rudolph, 79, retired, Columbus Meter Reading, died June 4.

Leonard Whaley, 67, Energy Delivery Headquarters-Gahanna, died June 8.

Indiana Michigan Power Company

Ralph Horning, 83, retired, South Bend Office, died June 11.

Kentucky Power Company

Margaret Pigman, 88, retired, Hazard Office, died June 14.

Willis Shannon, 77, retired, Big Sandy Plant, died June 19.

Ohio Power Company

Richard Bailey, 81, retired, Lancaster Office Building, died June 21.

James Farnsworth, 82, retired, Muskingum River Plant, died June 22.

Joseph Jackfert, 101, retired, Cardinal Plant, died June 11.

Paul Rafa, 87, retired, Cardinal Plant, died June 22.

Donald Reed, 88, retired, Bucyrus Office Building, died June 7.

Bobby Richie, 82, retired, Gavin Plant, died June 4.

Sally Maneely, 77, retired, Coshocton Office Building, died June 19.

Public Service Company of Oklahoma

Otto Bryant, 86, retired, Tulsa General Office, died June 5.

Alice Clinch, 92, retired, Tulsa General Office, died June 20.

Kenneth Gee, 89, retired, Tulsa General Office, died May 20.

Wilbur Harmon, 90, retired, Tulsa General Office, died June 11.

Texas Central

Catherine Murray, 88, retired, Corpus Christi Office, died June 27.

Walter Rodocker, 68, Aransas Pass Service Center, died June 13.

Harold Walker, 92, retired, Corpus Christi Office, died May 5.

Orval Wilbur, 83, retired, Corpus Christi Office, died June 12.

Texas North

A.M. Stocks, 82, retired, Abilene General Office, died May 30.

June Retirements

AEP Ohio

Diane Montgomery, Energy Delivery Headquarters-Gahanna, retired June 1 after 15 years of service.

Mary Murdock, 850 Tech Center, retired June 1 after 30 years of service.

James Orlando, Canton General Service Center, retired June 1 after 10 years of service.

Kim Roose, Mound Street Service Center, retired June 2 after 46 years of service.

Christi Vesely, Canton Eastern Regional Office, retired June 7 after 35 years of service.

Robert Warner, Lima Service Center, retired June 2 after 36 years of service.

Dana Wieman, Lima Service Center, retired June 1 after 37 years of service.

Ronald Yoho, Wheeling Service Building, retired June 1 after 29 years of service.

Kenton Young, Delaware Service Center, retired June 25 after 40 years of service.

AEP Service Corporation

Richard Bewley, Fayetteville Operations, retired June 10 after 25 years of service.

Sheryl Cleaver, AEP Headquarters, retired June 18 after 35 years of service.

Doug Duvall, AEP Headquarters, retired June 4 after 34 years of service.

Jeffrey Hutchinson, AEP Headquarters, retired June 4 after 35 years of service.

Roger Muncy, Home Worksite-South Carolina, retired June 4 after 42 years of service.

Richard Riley, AEP Headquarters, retired June 22 after 21 years of service.

David Wilder, Renaissance Tower, retired June 1 after 40 years of service.

AEP Texas

Larry Hardeway, El Campo Service Center, retired June 18 after 42 years of service.

Appalachian Power Company

Warren Bailey, Lynchburg Service Center, retired June 24 after 26 years of service.

Arlen Breeden Jr., North Charleston Service Center, retired June 29 after 37 years of service.

John Maynard, Roanoke Main Office, retired June 1 after 29 years of service.

Larry Scarberry, St. Albans Service Center, retired June 25 after 38 years of service.

Generation

Randy Blue, Cardinal Plant, retired June 1 after 37 years of service.

Leslie Brown, Northeastern Station 3&4, retired June 2 after 37 years of service.

Bruce Butler, Cardinal Plant, retired June 1 after 27 years of service.

Diana Carpenter, Mountaineer Plant, retired June 1 after 37 years of service.

Mark Carroll, Conesville Plant, retired June 30 after 40 years of service.

Joe Day Jr., Amos Plant, retired June 1 after 26 years of service.

Robert Hadsell, Cardinal Plant, retired June 1 after 36 years of service.

Vicki Hanson, Gavin Plant, retired June 3 after 10 years of service.

Jerry Hodges, Amos Plant, retired June 25 after 36 years of service.

Jeffrey Huffman, Amos Plant, retired June 1 after 37 years of service.

Scott Kerr, Cardinal Plant, retired June 1 after 36 years of service.

John Mullins, Gavin Plant, retired June 16 after 40 years of service.

Arthur Offenberger, Muskingum River Plant, retired June 18 after 44 years of service.

Marvin Poindexter, Amos Plant, retired June 4 after 44 years of service.

Robert Prentice, Alliance Railcar Facility, retired June 4 after 33 years of service.

Stephen Price, Mountaineer Plant, retired June 30 after 35 years of service.

Connie Prouse, Amos Plant, retired June 1 after 14 years of service.

Roger Moore, Amos Plant, retired June 11 after 36 years of service.

Robert Stone, Amos Plant, retired June 11 after 34 years of service.

Mark Swart, Leesville Hydro, retired June 1 after 37 years of service.

Leonard Welling, Conesville Plant, retired June 29 after 19 years of service.

Thomas Winenger, Cook Nuclear Plant, retired June 11 after 46 years of service.

Clifford Wyatt, Mountaineer Plant, retired June 1 after 40 years of service.

Indiana Michigan Power Company

Michael Burnett, South Bend Service Center, retired June 1 after 20 years of service.

Terry Graham, Marion Service Center, retired June 1 after 36 years of service.

David Masura, Three Rivers Service Center, retired June 1 after 40 years of service.

Dennis Reames, Three Rivers Service Center, retired June 1 after 38 years of service.

Peter VandeVisse, Buchanan Nuclear Generation Office, retired June 1 after 11 years of service.

Mary Lou Wierda, Elkhart Service Center, retired June 30 after 25 years of service.

Kentucky Power Company

Shirley Gerlach, Robert E. Matthews Service Center, retired June 1 after 32 years of service.

Public Service Company of Oklahoma

Donald Carey, Tulsa General Office, retired June 24 after 26 years of service.

Southwestern Electric Power Company

Charles Brakeville, Haughton Operations Center, retired June 2 after 38 years of service.

Keith Honey, Longview Operations, retired June 1 after 35 years of service.

Nina Hustus, Shreveport General Office, retired June 10 after 15 years of service.

Alvin Tyler, Fayetteville Operations, retired June 1 after 36 years of service.

Transmission

Keith Bailey, T&D Operations, retired June 18 after 36 years of service.

Kim Bates, Cambridge Transmission Service Center, retired June 3 after 24 years of service.

Lathora Meeks Jr., Bluefield (Va.) Service Center, retired June 1 after 35 years of service.

Michael Ray, Mound Street Service Center, retired June 11 after 40 years of service.

Domingo Tonche, T&D Operations, retired June 4 after 35 years of service.

William Wilhelm, John W. Vaughan Center, retired June 1 after 36 years of service.

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